Category Archives: LPPF News

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Observations Strengthen Theory

New observations over the past month have lent support to the hypotheses LPPFusion Chief Scientist Eric Lerner has put forward to explain the erosion of the tungsten electrodes in the last experiment. In turn, the strengthening of these hypotheses has concretized plans for the next experiment. First, at the ICDMP conference in Poland, Dr. Monika…

Assembly Begins for New Tungsten Experiments

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LPPFusion’s research team started to re-assemble our experimental fusion device, FF-1 at the beginning of December to prepare for new experiments with pure tungsten and a shorter electrode. The first step is to coat part of the 10-cm long tungsten anode with indium, a soft metal. The indium will be squeezed against narrow circular ridges…

Summer Intern(s) Needed

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As in many past summers, next summer LPPFusion will be hiring one or two interns for 2017. We invite undergraduate and graduate students in physics, chemistry or any engineering field to apply for these paid, full time summer positions. Interns will be helping out as needed in the lab, but will also work on special…

Collaboration Begins with Krakow Effort for Hydrogen-Boron Fusion

In the same trip to Poland in October, Lerner also visited the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow. There he discussed with Dr. Marek Scholz and other researchers the Institute’s plans to initiate their own research into hydrogen-boron fusion using a plasma focus device. This is only the second…

Beryllium Anodes Arrive, Cathode Due in February

Right on schedule, Rev Manufacturing delivered from California two new beryllium anodes to LPPFusion at the beginning of September. The anodes are carefully sealed (see Fig.3) and will remain so until we are ready to use them. Beryllium is vulnerable to reactions with humid air, so we will minimize both humidity and the time the…

New Insights Help Plan Next Experiments

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In all scientific research, experiments and observations give rise to new theoretical concepts, which in turn lead to the design of more advanced experiments. LPPFusion has gone through such a cycle in the past few months, with new insights revising our plans for the next experiments. In August, the expected availability of beryllium anodes in…

Experiments, Conference Discussions Yield New Understanding of Impurities

The recently-completed set of experiments with LPPFusion’s FF-1 device, combined with discussions with colleagues at the International Center for Dense Magnetized Plasma (ICDMP) conference in Warsaw, have produced a greater understanding of the ways impurities are produced in our device and how to reduce them. LPPFusion’s research team has long identified heavy-metal impurities, produced by…

Safety Procedures, Instrument Design Paves Way for Beryllium Anode

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The next step beyond the new experiments with the existing tungsten electrodes is the installation of the beryllium anode, expected to arrive in September. This will be the first time that a beryllium electrode has been used in any plasma focus device, an idea covered by LPPFusion’s patents. While most work is still concentrated on…

Preparations Advance for Next Round of Tungsten Experiments

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For the past month, the research team has been preparing for a second and final series of experiments with the two tungsten electrodes, before moving on to the planned combination of tungsten cathode and beryllium anode later in the fall (see next story). In the course of these preparations, we’ve come across a possible route…

FF-1 Shots Put 12 kJ into Pinch Region, Needs 3D Modeling Help to Go Higher

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A new analysis of LPPFusion’s experimental results with the FF-1 device shows that fully 20% of the input energy was concentrated into the pinch region, where fusion reactions occur. As much as 12 kJ out of the capacitor bank’s initial 60 kJ was compressed into the pinch. These results, obtained in June with tungsten electrodes…